Just made this (Literally….it’s still hot) and I gotta say, I was skeptical! When it started to balloon out of the cup I was terrified! BUT, it legitimately tastes like a grainy bread. I’m using this for open faced sloppy joe tonight so I’m gonna toast the next batch. For those of you wondering, I used 2T of ghee instead of the 2.5 of butter. Came out perfect. 552 calories/16g protein for the whole “loaf”. Not that us Paleo kids care about calories. wink wink.
Arrowroot Starch: You may also see arrowroot starch labeled as arrowroot flour or arrowroot powder. It’s made from tubers traditionally from a plant called Maranta arundinacea, but commercially it’s often found as a mixture of various starches, including starch from the cassava root. Similar to tapioca starch, arrowroot starch is used in paleo baking to improve the texture of baked goods, lightening them up a bit, and help with browning.
I would like to try this Paleo recipe as it really does look like a healthy one! We appreciate all your hard work “tweaking” these recipes to get them just right! However, I would like to comment that some of your recipe “supporters” live in Canada and we can’t get some of the brand named items you mention at times. Perhaps for this reason some have asked re substitutions. As an example, I made your Chocolate Prune Bars the other day but wasn’t sure about the NuNaturals Stevia. I didn’t know whether it was a powder or a liquid, and since we don’t have that brand here I took a “leap in the dark” and used SweetLeaf Vanilla Creme since there was vanilla in the recipe anyway. I’m sure yours turned out better than mine but I’m going to try again. Also, wasn’t sure whether the chocolate chips were semi-sweet or unsweetened, but just used what I had, which was bittersweet. I guess that item is pretty well a personal choice. Just thought I would let you know that we do have some different brand names in Canada which can sometimes confuse the issue.
We cannot time travel and join our Paleo ancestors by the campfire as they prepare to eat; likewise, shards of ancient pottery and fossilized teeth can tell us only so much. If we compare the diets of so-called modern hunter-gatherers, however, we see just how difficult it is to find meaningful commonalities and extract useful dietary guidelines from their disparate lives (see infographic). Which hunter–gatherer tribe are we supposed to mimic, exactly? How do we reconcile the Inuit diet—mostly the flesh of sea mammals—with the more varied plant and land animal diet of the Hadza or !Kung? Chucking the many different hunter–gather diets into a blender to come up with some kind of quintessential smoothie is a little ridiculous. "Too often modern health problems are portrayed as the result of eating 'bad' foods that are departures from the natural human diet…This is a fundamentally flawed approach to assessing human nutritional needs," Leonard wrote. "Our species was not designed to subsist on a single, optimal diet. What is remarkable about human beings is the extraordinary variety of what we eat. We have been able to thrive in almost every ecosystem on the Earth, consuming diets ranging from almost all animal foods among populations of the Arctic to primarily tubers and cereal grains among populations in the high Andes.”

To get an idea of what that means, we turned to the experts, including Loren Cordain, PhD, a professor emeritus at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado, and the author of The Paleo Diet; Erin Holley, RD, of Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio; and Lona Sandon, PhD, RD, an assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.


this is a great recipe! I am not full-on paleo, primal, or other, but like to experiment. This one is a keeper. I followed the recipe pretty much to the point, just adding in a tablespoon of hemp protein powder (pure hemp) with the flour mixture. It has wonderful flavor and I’m looking forward to having it with some almond butter tonight. Thanks for all your testing! You’ve made happy recipients out of many of us :)
A number of randomized clinical trials have compared the paleo diet to other eating plans, such as the Mediterranean Diet or the Diabetes Diet. Overall, these trials suggest that a paleo diet may provide some benefits when compared with diets of fruits, vegetables, lean meats, whole grains, legumes and low-fat dairy products. These benefits may include:

Eat Like a Dinosaur: Recipe & Guidebook for Gluten-free Kids by Paleo Parents. The Book is a colorful children's story describing the paleo diet, chock-full of recipes without grains, dairy, soy or refined sugar. For those with food allergies, the top 8 allergens have been visually marked on each recipe for children to self-identify recipes that may contain eggs, nuts, fish, or shellfish. Published March 20, 2012.
My quest has been bread with more than 5 gr fiber. Chia flour is what I have found. I substitute it for 1/3 of the flour in a recipe and it does the trick. It is lavender though and does tend to make my sandwich bread a little grey. But it is very pretty in blue berry muffins and pancakes. I grind my own rice flour, millet and corn flour and it makes a huge difference.
This is the best keto bread I have ever made! By far! My bread was a little flat, but I think my baking powder needs to be replaced. I did make two substitutions with this recipe. I replaced egg whites with whole eggs, and ghee with coconut oil. Everything else, I already had on hand. I will definitely make this again and play with it a little. Really delicious bread.
Thank you so much for this recipe! I’ve made it several times and I love it for myself. I have tried many versions: coconut oil, ghee, butter, coconut cream, refrigerated coconut milk from a can, shaken (after a couple of days in the fridge) and full fat yogurt. I always beat my eggs for 2-3 minutes (by hand) until very frothy before adding the wet ingredients then beat them again after incorporating wet ingredients to get them thick. Although I like them all, I have had the best results for rising (and actual ‘bread-like’ texture and loft) from coconut oil and yogurt. My husband eats gluten-free but not paleo so when his favourite GF bread was out at the store he was stuck (he’s a ‘must eat sandwich for lunch’ guy and we’ve tried all the GF varieties in our store, some of them complete rocks!). I offered to make him a loaf and he accepted (he’s had this loaf before but felt it’s texture was more like a banana bread or zucchini bread than sandwich material). I got rave reviews from him today about the bread for his sandwich (made with coconut oil and yogurt). Total convert!! 

Thank you so much for this recipe! I had some with my egg for breakfast and it went really well as the bread has a slightly ‘eggy’ taste. It came out exactly as your photo. Some people asked for nutrition info and I have looked at just the calories and protein which are 1096 calories per loaf and 101g protein. Obviously the slice amounts vary on how many slices you cut it into – for me 14 slices so 113 calories and 7g protein per slice.

I recently found out I’m allergic to many of the foods that I’ve consumed over the years and was recently told to eat strictly Paleo……..and for someone who needs a map and directions in her own kitchen, for someone who has singlehandedly kept the restaurant business in the black, that’s a pretty big expectation. This bread has saved me and my fiance in so many of those, “I can’t do this any longer” moments when we really miss the old way of eating. We cant recommend this bread enough! Thank you!
Coconut Flour: As Lexi pointed out Coconut Flour is not a 1:1 ratio. Coconut flour absorbs a LOT of liquid, so you have to either combine it with other flours in light quantaties, or use 6 eggs for every 1/2 cup of flour. Yes, I said 6 eggs with every ONE HALF cup of coconut flour. You can also use various liquids. Either way, it needs to have the same consistency as it would if you used the almond flour, it should be thin like pancake. If not it will out very dense. 

Alright. So I saw this recipe yesterday, and knew I had to make it- even on a weeknight. Blender bread = so so easy (thank you!) Long story short, we’ve already eaten the whole loaf. My husband made awesome BLT’s for dinner, my toddler helped himself to a couple after dinner pieces. 😀 THEN. This morning my husband used the remaining slices to make open face breakfast sammies… runny egg and all. I did bake the loaf for quite a bit longer than you posted… but I’m pretty sure that is a reflection of our sad oven more than anything else. The bread has an awesome rustic texture… I’m going to try bruschetta with it next!! We did give each slice a quick fry in bacon grease to “toast” right before serving. Sidenote, I’m 6mo pregnant… so 2 full BLT’s is totally the norm for me right now 😀 Anyway, THANK YOU! This is my first time landing at your site… and I can’t wait to explore more of your recipes!!
Alcohol is a no-no if you are strict paleo. Beer is made from grains, and liquor also contains traces of gluten. But, good news for cider-lovers: most hard ciders are gluten-free, so they are allowed. Check the label to be sure. Red wine is more accepted in the paleo community because it contains the antioxidant resveratrol, but sorry chardonnay lovers, white wine is technically not allowed.
thanks for the reply, but im still confused. the arrowroot you have pictured at the bottom of the recipe is the “flour” not the powder. I used the powder. however, it was hard to find and the only bottle of it that I could find was short of the 1/2 cup required in the recipe. I see you can buy larger quantities of the powder on-line. I added a TBSP of regular baking powder to make up for the short arrowroot powder. It came out pretty good!
About 3 years ago I went grain free for the second time in my life. At that time I downloaded about 20 grain free bread recipes three were good and edible and could withstand the rigors of actual lunch meat/sandwich making, but this one has stood the test of time. This is the recipe I go back to every time, it delicious and passes the sandwich test. Here s what I have learned: I like to make a double batch, I like to beat the wet ingredients into a stiff foam, everything works best at room temperature, the baking time is about an hour in a glass pyrex loaf pan, It MUST be stored in the fridge wrapped in a paper towel then in a zippy bag, it needs to be toasted for sandwiches. I make this bread for non grain-free friends and neighbors and they love it too.
Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, photographer, videographer, clean eating expert, and mommy of four. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration.
Hi Erma, to keep my recipes grain-free you can substitute sunflower or pumpkin seed flour for the almond flour cup for cup. The taste is a little different but you may still really like it. These seed flour may be hard to find so you can make your own and the process is the same for making almond flour. I have a tutorial here: https://livinghealthywithchocolate.com/desserts/how-to-blanch-almonds-and-make-almond-flour-8387/
WOW! This bread is amazing! I have Gestational Diabetes, and have been struggling with bread since it has been spiking my sugars. Normally I don’t each much of it, but I was just craving it today. So I made a loaf and it is delicious! I went through the comments because I only have a full size loaf pan, and did as someone else mentioned, increased the recipe by .5 (for the eggs did 8 eggs rather than 7), and it came out the perfect size and absolutely delicious. Looking forward to enjoying it the rest of the week. I used a glass full size loaf and cooked for 40 minutes at 350 degrees. I topped it with extra flax seeds because I too love the nutty flavor of flax.
Is there any place to get organic almond flour–and please don’t talk about Bob’s Red Mills. Most of their products are NOT organic and that includes their almond flour. I am pretty disciplined about not using chemically grown food. Also, since most American almonds come from California there is the added concern about whether they are watered with waste water from oil companies.
Good to know these can be made without the palm oil. Can’t wait to try them! Many of us looking at these dietary changes see palm oil a lot, and it’s in many things on the grocery shelves. I avoid it completely however as unfortunately it’s production is destroying HUGE amounts of habitat/wildlife so isn’t a good ethical choice. Thanks for your great site!
I have made these so many times in the last few weeks and have shared the recipe with many friends. They are delicious and so easy! I don’t really like the taste of Palm shortening, so I used coconut oil, softening it in the microwave, not melting. But don’t put it in wet ingredients because the coldness from the eggs will harden it again. Mix with dry ingredients, working out all the lumps with hands and distributing it evenly. I double the recipe and then separate it. I have added rosemary or dill or jalapenos/bacon/cheese to batter. So delicious. I am going to try more variations and add other herbs as I go. Thank you so much for such a great recipe. I was missing bread and these are perfect for chicken salad, tuna salad, turkey burgers, etc. And…. I save so much money because the gluten free breads in the grocery store are so expensive.
Hi Kerstin, Sorry you had issues whipping the whites. It can sometimes be more difficult with the kind from a carton. The cream of tartar helps, but sometimes isn’t enough. Did you wait for the whites to be at room temp before beginning? This can help with whipping. Unfortunately the bread won’t turn out very well without getting the whites to stiff peaks. I hope it works for you next time, and if the cartons don’t work for you, you can try with the whites from whole eggs. You can use the yolks to make hollandaise sauce or creme brulee like this.
Don't go running away from this (slightly) longer list of ingredients just yet. These two-bite minis look—and taste—like something from the Cheesecake Factory, but they’re packed with good-for-you ingredients, like zucchini and cashews. They're worth every second (and every speckle of coconut sugar). Craving a caveman-size slab instead of these dainty bites? Just add the crust to a pie pan and make one big cheesecake instead.
Elizabeth, This recipe is a bit heavy on the eggs because they add structure here; without them, it would be difficult to get the same height without doing quite a bit of experimentation to find a suitable substitute. If you’re looking for a paleo-friendly bread-type of recipe, my Paleo Flatbread may be more useful. It’s more of a wrap or can be made thinner into a crepe, rather than a loaf of bread, but it is delicious. That recipe uses one egg, but I’ve successfully made it using a flax “egg” instead of a regular egg. Sorry I’m not able to be more help, but I hope you like the flatbread if you give it a try!
My substitutions were coconut flour instead of arrowroot and honey for maple syrup AND regular gluten free flour instead of almond flour….some almond flour but not all. I also used 3 large eggs instead of 4 medium ones. With saying all of that I had to put more liquid in..it was too dense. Coconut flour needs more liquid. The bread tastes great but it’s too dense and didn’the rIse enough. Did the maple syrup vs honey or lack of one egg have anything to do with that density? I also don’the like the sweet taste in bread. Don’t eat any sugar so I am probably super sensitive to that taste. Your thoughts on the density, not rising enough and 3 large eggs vs 4 medium ones, in terms of making the bread rise more? Also would like a harder seeded bread. Do u have a recipe for that? I like hard breads. The taste is very good but not for breakfast or sandwiches. Not for me at any rate. Any suggestions? Thanks for ur help!

Eat generous amounts of saturated fats like coconut oil and butter or clarified butter. Beef tallow, lard and duck fat are also good, but only if they come from healthy and well-treated animals. Beef or lamb tallow is a better choice than lamb or duck fat. Olive, avocado and macadamia oil are also good fats to use in salads and to drizzle over food, but not for cooking. For more information, have a look at our beginner’s guide to Paleo and fat.

Sometimes you don’t need a loaf of bread, and you just need enough for yourself to make a sandwich or to serve as a side to a hearty Paleo chili. This single serve recipe can easily be multiplied if needed, but it’s best when used as a one-serving bread when you don’t have the time, desire, or need for more than just enough for yourself. The way they’ve figure out how to make this Paleo friendly and ready to go in just a few minutes is impressive. It makes the perfect companion to all sorts of soups and stews, as the bookends to a sandwich, or as an accompaniment to eggs and bacon.
For example, the University of Lund found that a Paleolithic diet improves glucose tolerance more than a Mediterranean-like diet in 29 individuals with ischemic heart disease. The University of Lund also found, in a separate study, that the Paleolithic diet improved glycemic control and several cardiovascular risk factors compared to a Diabetes diet in 13 patients with type 2 diabetes in a three-month trial. Another study, by the Karolinska Institute in Huddinge, Sweden, found that eating short-term Paleolithic or hunter-gatherer diets to prevent cardiovascular diseases showed some favorable effects, but they noted that further studies were warranted. 
Chris Masterjohn has Cholesterol: Your Life Depends on It!, another web site pointing out that the war on cholesterol and the push to put people on statins is misguided. The site argues it is actually polyunsaturated fats, not saturated fats or cholesterol, that contribute to heart disease, cancer, liver damage, and aging. He also has a popular blog.
I am 77 autoimmune celiac. for two years I have been strictly grain free and diary free, salt free,eat no added sugar, all organic, no processed foods. I walk and walk and walk some more, garden and have no other health issues. I weigh now what I weighed at 27 after having had 4 babies. 133 pounds. I kept off a 65 pound weight loss easily and happily. I all back to the land for years and years and raised my own grain milled or ground it up and baked my own bread and made my own cheese from milk from my own goats and cows. So I know good and healthy. I would rather have the energy and brains I have now than go back to eating grain and dairy. I still make my own ‘cheese’ from nonfat yogurt.
The Stone Age Diet: Based on in-depth studies of human ecology and the diet of man by Walter L. Voegtlin. This was self-published back in 1975. Only a couple hundred copies were printed and distributed to friends and relatives. No one knew the book existed until some years later. In no way is he the father of the paleo diet. It is impossible to purchase. Apparently his descendents are planning a reprint, though the book is poorly written and not based upon factual anthropological information that even was available then. We have put up his Functional and Structural Comparison of Man's Digestive Tract with that of a Dog and Sheep. And a PDF can be found here.
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