A few days ago I was delighted to learn that Dr. Oz was going to again feature The Paleo Diet on his nationally syndicated television show along with one of my co-authors, Nell Stephenson, of The Paleo Diet Cookbook. I tuned into the Dr. Oz show and was happy about most of what I saw except for Chris Kresser, expounding upon the health virtues of a food group, beans and legumes, that definitely are not Paleo. Please read the following...
While going bonkers and eating chocolate creations 3 times per day is unnecessary (and would sorta defeat the point of Whole30, and Paleo in general) I DO think it’s a great time to explore all the Paleo dessert options out there – so we can have our cake (quite literally) – and still feel awesome after eating it.  That’s what Paleo treats and desserts are all about in my opinion – and it’s NO secret that I’m quite the fan of dessert, just check out the “sweet treats” section of the blog!
Argh! I’ve literally made 4 different recipes today for yeast free/gluten free breads, and every last one has been a fail. This one is in the oven as I write (please let it be good!). I had to sub a flour because hubby can’t have almond products so I will keep that in mind if it’s not perfect, but seems to at least have potential. I also only had duck eggs, which are large, so used 3 instead of 4 (can’t have chicken eggs either). I will let you know how it turned out! Thanks for the recipe!
I don’t know what i’m doing wrong with this bread. I’ve made it a few times as i like how it tastes toasted but it will not cook properly in the center. Every time i cook it i end up cooking it for another 30mins longer then the recipe requires and it’s still coming out moist in the center. You could not use it without toasting put it that way. Could it be because i’m using Canned coconut milk as opposed to yogurt? I’ve tried continuing to cook with foil over the top once the outside starts to look well done so the inside can keep cooking too.
I double the recipe, and started to put it into an 11 x 15 glass casserole, but I could see it was going to be spread too thin, so I hurriedly scraped the batter into a 9 x 12 pan. I baked it for 30 minutes, and it came out wonderfully. I cut it cake style into 12 squares, and by slicing them in half sideways, the squares are perfect as a bun or ciabatta. Holds together well, doesn’t crumble, nice thickness, and plenty of chewy crust.
I made this but didn’t have baking powder, so I subbed a little baking soda and greek yogurt instead. I also added some italian herb blend. I froze it overnight to take to camp. Now it’s perfect for a lunch or snack. I’m topping a slice with a little goat chesee, fresh basil, couple pieces of spring mix and a few cherry tomatoes on the side! It’s delicious!
As for the mixing…I mixed the dry ingredients in one bowl, then separated the egg yolks and whites, in bowls. I whipped the whites until they were thick. I added the yolks to the whites, and added the honey and oil. I mixed that up. I added the wet to the dry and mixed. It was really thick. Then I combined the baking soda and vinegar, mixing them. I added them to the whole mix and slightly stirred.
Finally found the recommended loaf size and could hardly wait to make this paleo bread. After 45 minutes and the toothpick coming out clean, removed it from the oven. After it cooled, cut it to serve and had two inches on either end and about a half an inch on the top and bottom that were edible. The middle consisted of what I would call an empty tunnel about the size of a silver dollar and surrounded by uncooked batter. Yuck. What’s so interesting is I made your Scrumptious Sandwich bread out of your book, and it turned out perfectly. I’ve been baking a LONG time, and I can’t even speculate as to what happened to this loaf. Did I have a massive air bubble in the middle, and, if so, why? Did using the food processor affect it? Any light you can shed on this will be greatly appreciated. I’ve been experimenting with the recipes in this cookbook and loving it. Please help me understand what happened to this paleo bread.
Excluding foods. The exclusion of entire categories of commonly eaten foods like whole grains and dairy requires frequent label reading in the supermarket and in restaurants. It may also increase the risk of deficiencies such as calcium, vitamin D, and B vitamins, if these nutrients are not consistently eaten from the allowed foods or a vitamin supplement. For example, there are some nondairy calcium-rich foods that are absorbed well by the body such as collard and turnip greens or canned bone-in sardines and salmon, but you would have to eat five or more servings of these greens and fish bones daily to meet recommended calcium needs. (Note that some greens like spinach that are touted to be calcium-rich also contain oxalates and phytates that bind to calcium so very little is actually absorbed.) One small, short-term intervention study of healthy participants showed a 53% decrease from baseline in calcium intake after following a Paleo diet for three weeks. [8] Furthermore, the exclusion of whole grains can result in reduced consumption of beneficial nutrients such as fiber and thus may increase one’s risk for diabetes and heart disease.
This is the third time I have made this bread. The first time I followed you directions and discovered the middle wasn’t quite baked all the way through. So I read some of the comments and tried it again. The second time I kept the oven temp the same and cut down on the butter and baked it for about 40-45 minutes. It turned out fine then. However it doesn’t that size of a loaf doesn’t last long in our house. So today I made it again and increased the recipe by half. I had bought a 12″ x 4.5″ x 3 ” bread loaf pan. I used 7 tbsp of Kerry Gold butter instead of 9 tbsp. Otherwise the rest was the same. I baked it at 355 degrees for 1 hour. It turned out perfectly. I couldn’t wait to let it cool too much. I love warm bread and just had to have a couple of slices. Btw- the organic almond flour I used was from our local grocery store health market section.
I use parchment paper to avoid the aluminum in the pan and that makes a nice liner to lift out the loaf (no cleaning!). I’ve made it with coconut oil, ghee, and regular butter… it’s always yummy! I’ve substituted coconut sugar for the honey and once even made it without a sweetener… it’s always fantastic! Occasionally I’ll substitute chia for the flax seed, too, but the basic recipe is the backbone for all my experimenting.
I cut the bread into thin slices and it is great toasted. I made a sandwich for my husband with bacon, lettuce and tomato and when I handed it to him he looked at me funny and after he took his first bite he asked me: “where did you buy this bread, can we eat bread now?” lol…. I told him I had made the bread with almond flour instead of wheat and he was thrilled.
Hello, this bread recipe looks great, and I really want to make it for my dad who is intolerant to gluten and must settle with the sad and tiny store bought gluten free loaves. However, the only bread pan I have is one inch larger in dimensions, do you recommend increasing the recipe? Like doubling it or using 1.5 times the ingredients? Thank you :)

I know that soy can cause inflammation and if you are not using soy free eggs, that could be part of the cause. It may not be the actual egg but the soy that is the problem. just a thought. Here is an article that has some interesting info on soy. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/29/soy-effects-on-women.aspx?e_cid=20120729_SNL_Art_1

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