Deadly Harvest: The Intimate Relationship Between Our Health and Our Food by Geoff Bond. The author is a nutritional anthropologist who has for years investigated both foods of the past and our prehistoric eating habits. Using the latest scientific research and studies of primitive tribal lifestyles, Bond first explains the actual diet that our ancestors followed--a diet that was and still is in harmony with the human species. He then describes how the foods in today's diets disrupt our biochemistry and digestive system, leading to health disorders such as allergies, arthritis, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis, obesity, and more. Most important, he explains the appropriate measures we can take to avoid these diseases--and even beat them back--through healthy eating. The conclusions of Deadly Harvest are that disease control happens by eating a strict low-glycemic diet, lowering the percentage of body fat you carry around, eat a diet consisting of mostly non-starchy plant-based foods, eat a low-fat diet with ample amounts of omega-3 fats, maintain good colon health, engage in regular physical activity, get some daily sunshine, and reduce chronic stress. If you do this, then diseases like cancer, heart disease, digestive problems, allergies, autoimmune diseases, brain diseases, diabetes, and obesity can be avoided. The Amazon reviews average to 5 stars.


Hi Trish, did mix whole flax seeds in the batter as opposed to using golden ground flaxseed meal? This changes the texture. Also, the loaf pan you used seems larger and that’s why your bread is not as tall. You can either use this pan you have and double the recipe or make it in an 8×4-inch pan like I do here. Did you make any other modifications to the recipe? Happy you like the taste!
I’ve been following a gluten-free diet for two years now. I don’t adhere to a strictly Paleo diet but I use a lot of Paleo recipes I find on Pinterest. This is the first time I’ve ever left a comment or feedback. After enduring many labor-intensive, gluten-free and Paleo bread recipes, I have found my go-to! This is SO simple with a WONDERFUL taste and texture! I don’t keep flax on hand so I use sweet sorghum flour (I realize that’s not Paleo but it works for me.) I also add a packet of quick rise yeast simply because I like yeast flavor. I turn my oven on the lowest temp and set the batter on top of the stove for an hour and it does rise nicely. There’s no need to wait if you’re not looking for it to rise. The hands on time is just as the recipe indicates-minutes! I also just realized that the Paleo casserole dish I had intended to make for dinner tonight (and have already made several times) is from the same source and is DELICIOUS and healthy, comfort food! Thank you Kaylie for the simple, fantastic recipes!
Hi Anita, I double checked my carton egg whites. 3/4 cup of egg whites is equivalent to 4 large whole eggs, not 4 large egg whites. Mine has a chart for converting whole eggs, and the conversion for egg whites only is below the chart. It says 2 tablespoons of liquid egg whites are equivalent to the egg white of 1 whole egg. So, 12 large egg whites would be 24 tablespoons, or 1 1/2 cups as written in the recipe. Hope this helps!
Hi Elana…I did this with your bread and it was ridiculously tasty!!! Herb roasted tomatoes on top of your Paleo bread spread with a little leftover chevre that I’d rolled in some Creole seasoning. I LOVE this bread (well, and all of your recipes really)!!! Thank you. https://www.facebook.com/holly.oleary.14/posts/10204240445388312?comment_id=10204240832958001&offset=0&total_comments=8

Of course, this is just the basic of basic recipes, and you can spice it up with some Italian seasoning or some fruit mixed into the batter. When making the basic bread, I’ve found that my favorite way of eating this Paleo bread is with a hot bowl of chilli, but it also tastes great with some paleo jam or dipped in some soup. It’s not the best bread you’ve ever had, but it’s pretty good for 6 and 1/2 minutes of cooking!
I just made it using all the the optional ingredients but I didn’t have a food processor so I whipped/mixed everything by hand. One thing I noticed is that the top of the bread cracked unevenly. Could I have over fluffed the egg whites? Maybe creating an artificial cut in the middle could solve that next time? It rose very well and nearly doubled in size, though the size is still a bit small for my liking. I will most likely use 1.5x the amount next time. It smells great and I’m about to chow down on this!
“All plants contain chlorogenic acid, mostly in the stems and leaves, but sunflowers also have it in the seeds. A spokeswoman for Red River Commodities says that SunButter does indeed turn cookies and other baked products green as they cool. The solution, she says, is to reduce the amount of baking soda or baking powder in your recipe by almost half, which balances the acidity of the ingredients and keeps them from changing color. Whether your cookies will rise adequately with half the leaven is a good question, but she says some people who have gotten in touch with the company say they don’t notice any difference. Adding a bit of lemon juice to your dough or batter can also help maintain expected colors. ”
Meet Grok. According to his online profile, he is a tall, lean, ripped and agile 30-year-old. By every measure, Grok is in superb health: low blood pressure; no inflammation; ideal levels of insulin, glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides. He and his family eat really healthy, too. They gather wild seeds, grasses, and nuts; seasonal vegetables; roots and berries. They hunt and fish their own meat. Between foraging, building sturdy shelters from natural materials, collecting firewood and fending off dangerous predators far larger than himself, Grok's life is strenuous, perilous and physically demanding. Yet, somehow, he is a stress-free dude who always manages to get enough sleep and finds the time to enjoy moments of tranquility beside gurgling creeks. He is perfectly suited to his environment in every way. He is totally Zen.
Almost equal numbers of advocates and critics seem to have gathered at the Paleo diet dinner table and both tribes have a few particularly vociferous members. Critiques of the Paleo diet range from the mild—Eh, it's certainly not the worst way to eat—to the acerbic: It is nonsensical and sometimes dangerously restrictive. Most recently, in her book Paleofantasy, evolutionary biologist Marlene Zuk of the University of California, Riverside, debunks what she identifies as myths central to the Paleo diet and the larger Paleo lifestyle movement.

I just wanted to say that I made this bread and it came out fantastic! I’m very pleased with it. It held together nicely and had a good taste. I felt it was also a great base for maybe some nut additions or raisin bread for a sweet twist. I’m definitely going to be playing around with this recipe. It was so EASY to put together too! Just perfect for a busy family trying to stay healthy and feel good. Thanks so much Elana!

Autoimmunity is a process in which our bodies own immune system attacks “us.” Normally the immune system protects us from bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections. The immune system identifies a foreign invader, attacks it, and ideally clears the infection. A good analogy for autoimmunity is the case of tissue rejection after organ donation. If someone requires a new heart, lung kidney or liver due to disease or injury, a donor organ may be an option. The first step in this process is trying to find a tissue “match”. All of us have molecules in our tissues that our immune system uses to recognize self from non-self. If a donated organ is not close enough to the recipient in tissue type the immune system will attack and destroy the organ. In autoimmunity, a similar process occurs in that an individuals own tissue is confused as something foreign and the immune system attacks this “mislabeled” tissue. Common forms of autoimmunity include Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, and Vitiligo to name only a tiny fraction of autoimmune diseases. Elements of autoimmunity are likely at play in conditions as seemingly unrelated as Schizophrenia, infertility, and various forms of cancer.
I wanted to say thank you for the recipe. I made it today with my Vitamix. I used whole raw almonds and whole flax seed that I ground up in the Vitamix in batches rather than almond flour and flaxseed meal. I substituted two single serving packages of stevia for the honey and mixed everything in the Vitamix. My bread turned out great and tastes wonderful. The almond skins and stevia changed the color a little from the picture on the web site but my loaf still looks good (lighter crust and darker interior). (I used 1.5 cups of whole almonds, 2 tablespoons coconut flour, ¼ cup of whole flaxseeds, ¼ teaspoon salt, 1.5 teaspoons baking soda, 5 large eggs, ¼ cup coconut oil, 2 packets of stevia, and 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar in the Magic Loaf Pan.) Thanks again.
I cant have flax seed, they trigger severe migraines. When i google replacing flax seeds or any thing else they say you need to know why they are added to the recipe for flavor and nutrition or as binders. In your recipes can you add some sort of code B for binding and F for flavor then its much easier to go about making substitutions. In this recipe is the flax for binding or flavor ? If its for binding can i add more eggs and how many ?
My substitutions were coconut flour instead of arrowroot and honey for maple syrup AND regular gluten free flour instead of almond flour….some almond flour but not all. I also used 3 large eggs instead of 4 medium ones. With saying all of that I had to put more liquid in..it was too dense. Coconut flour needs more liquid. The bread tastes great but it’s too dense and didn’the rIse enough. Did the maple syrup vs honey or lack of one egg have anything to do with that density? I also don’the like the sweet taste in bread. Don’t eat any sugar so I am probably super sensitive to that taste. Your thoughts on the density, not rising enough and 3 large eggs vs 4 medium ones, in terms of making the bread rise more? Also would like a harder seeded bread. Do u have a recipe for that? I like hard breads. The taste is very good but not for breakfast or sandwiches. Not for me at any rate. Any suggestions? Thanks for ur help!

I’m excited to hear that! If I have a chance to do any recipe testing myself, I will let you know if I come up with anything worthwhile . . .Staying tuned and looking forward to it! Is there any way for me to be notified of your replies to my comment(s)? I had to come back to this page to see this, so just wondering (and I do have the box clicked about “notify me of follow-up comments by email”). Thanks again!

Hi, I just made this bread for the first time & my fiancé & I absolutely LOVE it! I did not use the flour you recommended my first time around as I am knew to “gluten free” & just picked a bag of almond flower off the shelf without realizing the specifics but I still loved it & will try the blanched almond flower next time around! I have been a bread lover my whole life so trying to implement the Paleo, Gluten free life style is a bit challenging for me! I must say you “saved” the day today! I do want to say that the bread came out closer to a more corn bread type then a traditional sandwich bread consistency. Do you have any tips I can use to make it as close to a traditional white bread for sandwiches? I would love to hear from you as I am a complete novace at this lol…thanks again! I’m so glad I found your sight so early in the game for me 🙂


Question – Baking soda has too much sodium for me – I don’t think I can substitute double the baking powder instead (gluten free and sodium free Hain brand Featherweight)- looking on the label it says it cannot be substituted for baking soda and I would assume that is because it is chemically formulated differently than a normal baking powder. Wondering what else I could use in place of the baking soda – I need a low sodium alternative. I made this recipe and it is wonderful and would love to continue to make it in a low sodium version. Has anyone ever tried the low sodium baking soda – Ener-G brand ? Would I still use the cider vinegar?
Maya, this is a beautiful looking bread. I’m going to try it, but before I do, I’d like to know if you have ever tried doubling the recipe. It seems that it would work–based on the fact that my almond flour bread that I have made for years uses 3 1/4 cups flour, and turns out pretty well. (I’m pretty content with my recipe, but admit that yours looks better due to the whiteness and it appears to have more air bubbles, indicating it’s probably lighter.) If I don’t hear from you, I’ll probably go ahead and double it, and use a 9×5 pan–wish me luck.
I just made this bread and it came out great although I did adjust a few ingredients. I made this bread with four eggs(1 less than called for). Also I whipped the egg whites separately until they formed peaks(in order to make the bread less dense). Lastly, I added two tablespoons of applesauce to make up for the missing egg. This bread did take 45 minutes to bake, but I lowered the temperature to 245 because the outside was cooking faster than the inside. In the end this bread came out delicious and I enjoyed it with jam and honey, happy baking.
Made this bread the other night and it is so wonderful!!.Love it slightly warmed with a pat of butter.My only problem is that it did not rise that much so can’t really use for a sandwich.My eggs were not fresh nor my refrigerated flaxseed meal..I used a glass loaf pan (buttered).I did cook at 350 degrees for the 30 min and it came out wonderful!!Thanks so much for the recipe.I love the recipes with honey and/or stevia, sucanat or rapadura.
I don’t like keeping track of how much I’ve eaten or obsessing over how many grams of a particular nutrient I’ve had. Not only do I hate counting calories, but I know that calories are really only half of the battle, as they’re not all created equal – 400 calories of Doritos do NOT have the same effect on your body as 400 calories of high-quality vegetables and protein.
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