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Hi Brenda, There are various reasons but the most common one is that coconut flour is extremely absorbent and needs a lot of eggs to offset how much moisture it absorbs. If you used a liquid like milk or water, it would fall apart. That being said, this recipe is not dry or dense. Did you try making it? Whipping the egg whites creates the exact opposite effect and the bread turns out light and fluffy. Hope you’ll give it a try!
Eat generous amounts of saturated fats like coconut oil and butter or clarified butter. Beef tallow, lard and duck fat are also good, but only if they come from healthy and well-treated animals. Beef or lamb tallow is a better choice than lamb or duck fat. Olive, avocado and macadamia oil are also good fats to use in salads and to drizzle over food, but not for cooking. For more information, have a look at our beginner’s guide to Paleo and fat.
I just made this tonight…I must say I was NOT holding out much hope, but O-M-G…it turned out delicious!! I didn’t have flax seeds (I used Chia seeds instead) and I didn’t have flaxseed meal…but had Flaxseed milled….and hey…it worked!! Thank you so much for the recipe. My only issue was that the top didn’t brown, it stayed kind of white-ish, I didn’t want to leave it in any longer cause I was afraid of over-cooking…any tips for getting the top to brown?
Hi Broke, so there are a few things that could be affecting the texture of your bread. First, do you have an oven thermometer to make sure the temperature is where you need it to be? This could affect the baking time. It’s ok if you need to bake it longer, and I would let it cook until you test the middle of the bread with a stick inserted into the center. Only when it comes out clean you remove it from the oven.
What a fantastic recipe! I just made this and my house smells like sweet, toasty almonds. The texture is light and fluffy. Can’t wait to toast it gently in my oven in the morning with a little peach jam :) I used a glass pyrex loaf pan and lined it with parchment paper and lightly oiled it with coconut oil and it came out perfect,for anyone wondering about the specific pan you mentioned, which i haven’t heard of either. Thanks for this great recipe!

Bought this probably about a year ago or so... Finally decide to try it. WOW!!! It's been 18 days and I've lost over 16 pounds, and I've been eating all I want, and am never going hungry, so I have no cravings for anything, fresh home-made Italian bread or even my all-time favorite corn-type snacks, especially popcorn. Tried some hi carb, processed foods after the first week... felt like crap and lost my desire to eat them. I assume I will plateau one of these days and will have to start exercising, but right now I have a sedentary lifestyle with my job and additional personal activities.

Like many diets, the risks that come from eating the Paleo Diet is due to an imbalanced diet. For example, the Paleo Diet requires eating a large amount of meat. This can lead to excess consumption of saturated fat and cholesterol. “Those that follow this pattern of eating do not account for the differences in fatty acid composition of the meat of the animals today versus the composition 10,000 years ago." Malik told Live Science. "During our ancestors’ days, the fatty acid composition of livestock consisted of higher omega-3 fats— fats that actually improve our health. However, due to differences in the way we feed and raise livestock today, the meat tends to be higher in saturated fat.”
Gah, do you feel like I say that enough? Haha. But really, the way our bodies respond to certain foods and digestion is so individualized. I think it’ definitely depends on our gut flora, hormones, environment we are living, etc. Which is why I like to make gluten free allergy friendly recipes. Some people need grain free, nut free, others feel better on an egg free or vegan diet, and some are just starting off eating a gluten free diet and are overwhelmed.

Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002.
I made this bread last night and it turned out so delicious and moist! My 2 & 4 year old couldn’t get enough of it either which was so exciting to see. I want to start making this bread for my daughters school lunches but it’s a nut-free school. Could the almond flour be replaced by coconut flour? Or any other flour? If so, whould the measurements change of the ingredients? I am not a baker so I am a bit clueless.
Most Paleo dieters of today do none of this, with the exception of occasional hunting trips or a little urban foraging. Instead, their diet is largely defined by what they do not do: most do not eat dairy or processed grains of any kind, because humans did not invent such foods until after the Paleolithic; peanuts, lentils, beans, peas and other legumes are off the menu, but nuts are okay; meat is consumed in large quantities, often cooked in animal fat of some kind; Paleo dieters sometimes eat fruit and often devour vegetables; and processed sugars are prohibited, but a little honey now and then is fine.
I just made this and it was super delicious, but a little crumbly. I followed the directions exactly using almond flour, coconut flour and coconut oil instead of the ghee. I’m thinking an extra egg might bind it together a little more and perhaps cooking it just a little bit more, maybe 2 minutes instead of 90 seconds. I’m going to experiment. I also like the idea of using a half Tablespoon of applesauce as well. I have been Paleo for over a year and have really been craving bread. Usually I make pumpkin or zucchini pancakes to take care of it, but sometimes you just want BREAD. This is so easy and so quick and just perfect for one person (my husband doesn’t eat completely Paleo). Thank you. Hopefully my changes will work to make it a little more solid.
Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002.

Like many diets, the risks that come from eating the Paleo Diet is due to an imbalanced diet. For example, the Paleo Diet requires eating a large amount of meat. This can lead to excess consumption of saturated fat and cholesterol. “Those that follow this pattern of eating do not account for the differences in fatty acid composition of the meat of the animals today versus the composition 10,000 years ago." Malik told Live Science. "During our ancestors’ days, the fatty acid composition of livestock consisted of higher omega-3 fats— fats that actually improve our health. However, due to differences in the way we feed and raise livestock today, the meat tends to be higher in saturated fat.”


The Paleo diet not only misunderstands how our own species, the organisms inside our bodies and the animals and plants we eat have evolved over the last 10,000 years, it also ignores much of the evidence about our ancestors' health during their—often brief—individual life spans (even if a minority of our Paleo ancestors made it into their 40s or beyond, many children likely died before age 15). In contrast to Grok, neither Paleo hunter–gatherers nor our more recent predecessors were sculpted Adonises immune to all disease. A recent study in The Lancet looked for signs of atherosclerosis—arteries clogged with cholesterol and fats—in more than one hundred ancient mummies from societies of farmers, foragers and hunter–gatherers around the world, including Egypt, Peru, the southwestern U.S and the Aleutian Islands. "A common assumption is that atherosclerosis is predominately lifestyle-related, and that if modern human beings could emulate preindustrial or even preagricultural lifestyles, that atherosclerosis, or least its clinical manifestations, would be avoided," the researchers wrote. But they found evidence of probable or definite atherosclerosis in 47 of 137 mummies from each of the different geographical regions. And even if heart disease, cancer, obesity and diabetes were not as common among our predecessors, they still faced numerous threats to their health that modern sanitation and medicine have rendered negligible for people in industrialized nations, such as infestations of parasites and certain lethal bacterial and viral infections.
Paloa, my dear woman! You need to be recognized as a saint! I just made this bread and holy smokes. It. Is. Awesome! I will make a few tweaks the next time I bake it – I baked it for high altitude (I’m at 5800 ft) but apparently my oven is on steroids – it was to hot and the top was over brown – I checked it about 20 min in and it was already dark. But, I have a plan for next time. When I pulled it out of the pan, a corner came off – which was great because I didn’t have to wait to try it! I’ve also tried your chocolate sour cream cupcakes and the cream cheese frosting this week – holy smokes they are delicious! I’m so glad I found you and can’t thank you enough for sharing your knowledge and recipes with all of us! Have a great week! –Rena
If you have more questions on specific foods, we’ve included a comprehensive list of paleo diet foods below. We’ve provided a list of the foods that are allowed on the paleo diet. We’ve also broken this list down into the specific food groups, so you can see which meats, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and fats are on the paleo diet. In addition to all of that, we’ve also included a comprehensive list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet.
According to Adrienne Rose Johnson, the idea that the primitive diet was superior to current dietary habits dates back to the 1890s with such writers as Dr. Emmet Densmore and Dr. John Harvey Kellogg. Densmore proclaimed that "bread is the staff of death," while Kellogg supported a diet of starchy and grain-based foods.[11] The idea of a Paleolithic diet can be traced to a 1975 book by gastroenterologist Walter Voegtlin,[7]:41 which in 1985 was further developed by Stanley Boyd Eaton and Melvin Konner, and popularized by Loren Cordain in his 2002 book The Paleo Diet.[8] The terms caveman diet and stone-age diet are also used,[12] as is Paleo Diet, trademarked by Cordain.[13]
[…] Review: I tried my best to modify my mom’s stuffing recipe with paleo bread, but some things are not meant to be.  Stuffing is one of those things that need the real thing in order to taste authentic.  It wasn’t terrible, but if you want that REAL stuffing taste, you won’t find it here. The bread recipe on it’s own was not bad at all, check it out here! […]
Hi Winston! If you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread will rise, but it won’t fill the pan to the right height. Here’s an example that might help –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the bread “rising” and the height of the loaf :-)
I love this bread!!! Because of this bread, I can eat a sandwich now and then and not be in pain from gluten and additives. I’ve also made it into French toast and it came out great. Dairy is a problem food for me, so I substitute the butter for coconut oil and use coconut cream in place of yogurt. I freeze this bread in half loaves so I always have some on hand. Delicious!!

Hi Maya, I have made this twice and the first was actually closer than the second! The second one was raised really well when I put the foil on for the last 10-15 mins of cook time and when I took it out 12 mins later it had completely fallen! Now it is almost wet in the center though there are air pockets in it, it’s very odd. The first loaf was pretty flat the whole time and I am pretty sure that was because I didn’t have my egg whites whipped enough but they were spot on for the second loaf. I am also thinking it might be my baking powder after reading some of the comments. I plan to try again and just use a baking soda/cream of tartar mix rather than the baking powder. Any other suggestions? Anyone? LOL!


My 16 month old son loves the bread. He prefers it over the bakery italian bread(full of gluten and yeast) that we normally get him. Plus our dog is allergic to grains, so now I don’t have to worry about our son sharing his bread with her. As for me, I’m allergic to yeast and I’ve wanted to reduce gluten in my diet. Finding gluten and yeast free bread is nearly impossible. 
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