I haven’t tried to make many low carb breads so I don’t have much of a basis for comparison. This bread is good if you don’t expect it to be like normal bread. It takes a bit of getting used to. It’s very dense and heavy, not light like my store-bought lower carb bread. My advice is to slice it as thinly as you can – I got 20 slices about 0.5 thick but thinner would be better. I’ve tried it with peanut butter and with homemade sugar-free strawberry jam, but I think it was best sliced thinly, toasted and used as crackers with ham, cheese, tomato etc.
I notice that you call for Celtic sea salt in your recipes – any particular reason why you call for that over other kinds of salt – i.e., regular table salt, kosher salt, or other types of sea salts? I ask because I don’t have this particular salt at home, but have others, and don’t want to ruin the recipe(s) if the measurement conversions are different for fine ground vs. coarse, for instance….
Five roots, both bitter and sweet, are staples in the Hiwi diet, as are palm nuts and palm hearts, several different fruits, a wild legume named Campsiandra comosa, and honey produced by several bee species and sometimes by wasps. A few Hiwi families tend small, scattered and largely unproductive fields of plantains, corn and squash. At neighboring cattle ranches in a town about 30 kilometers away, some Hiwi buy rice, noodles, corn flour and sugar. Anthropologists and tourists have also given the Hiwi similar processed foods as gifts (see illustration at top).
Evolution of the Human Diet: The Known, the Unknown, and the Unknowable by Peter S. Ungar. Diet is key to understanding the ecology and evolution of our distant ancestors and their kin, the early hominins. A study of the range of foods eaten by our progenitors underscores just how unhealthy many of our diets are today. This volume brings together authorities from disparate fields to offer new insights into the diets of our ancestors. Paleontologists, archaeologists, primatologists, nutritionists and other researchers all contribute pieces to the puzzle. The book has four sections: Reconstructed diets based on hominin fossils--tooth size, shape, structure, wear, and chemistry, mandibular biomechanics. Archaeological evidence of subsistence--stone tools and modified bones. Models of early hominin diets based on the diets of living primates--both human and non-human, paleoecology, and energetics. Nutritional analyses and their implications for evolutionary medicine.
Made this today. Came out perfectly! Hubby and son are grain free, and son has Autism which comes with food sensory issues and limited palate! My son liked this bread. It’s true that it’s not a standard slice like with traditional loaves made with wheat flour, but it’s big enough to make a sandwich still. Thanks for the great recipe! Tried to rate it but it won’t let me go up to 5 stars so rather than give you less, I’ll just not rate it officially. But….5 stars!!
Excellent recipe. I doubled the recipe so it’s standard bread slice size. I baked it for almost 60 mins (fan forced oven 325F) checking it about 50 mins in. It turned out amazing. Very filling. One sandwich fills me right up. Each slice is about 240 calories if the whole loaf is cut into 16 slices. Thank you for the recipe. I will bake it several times a week. I wrap the bread in cheese cloth and inside a ziploc bag and keep it in the fridge so it will last longer. I’m Australian and I have to eat it with Gluten Free Vegemite. OMG… delicious. I use a Coconut Spread, basically taste like butter and smear vegemite on it and OMG YUM!!! I’m in love and found something I can keep around when I’m hungry on the spot. Thank you! I have a beautiful picture of the loaf. Too bad I can’t find a place to post on here. If you have one made with coconut flour, let me know and if it sticks as well together like Almond flour. I think the Arrowroot does the trick to sticking it all together.
This is the best grain-free bread recipe I have ever tried. I didn’t have the loaf pan so I used one of my small casserole dishes and it came out square and a little darker around the edges. I used 1 1/2oz. of coconut oil and mixed it with 1/2oz. of melted butter and it came out really moist. It also came out dark like whole wheat bread, so I am assuming that I used just a little too much flax meal. I love you for taking the time to perfect this!!! I’m thinking of making a spice bread next time. Let you know if it works!!

Hi Romy, almond flour is lot less absorbent than coconut flour (like A LOT). I know a few people have tried using oat flour with success, but I worry that almond flour would not be sufficient for absorbing the almond butter and creating a nice, firm texture. I’d recommend starting with about 3/4 cup almond flour, and experimenting as needed. Same for the stevia! Good luck–let me know how it turns out! 🙂

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