I just used a 9 x 5 pan and did not change the recipe proportions at all. Since this is the only loaf pan I have, instead, I pushed the dough against one side of the pan and formed a small loaf that is closer to the 7.5 x 3.5 pan size that Elana says to use. The dough was sticky enough to hold together fine and did not collapse or spread out during baking. It’s not the most beautiful creation, but it’s proportioned OK and tastes fine. I say – make it work with what you have and you’ll be alright. 

I make my own ACV from apple scraps. It’s so easy….after peeling and coring apples for another recipe, you take the scraps, let them air dry for a bit, then put them in a jar with water, cover with coffee filter and rubberband, put in cabinet and let it sit. 3 days is minimum, and better is 5-6 weeks or longer. I have let it sit for months and have come out with a great product. My first batch, I did add a couple tablespoons of Braggs as a starter. This will create a “mother” you can use over and over again. It’s a continuous process…and you never run out of ACV!
My 16 month old son loves the bread. He prefers it over the bakery italian bread(full of gluten and yeast) that we normally get him. Plus our dog is allergic to grains, so now I don’t have to worry about our son sharing his bread with her. As for me, I’m allergic to yeast and I’ve wanted to reduce gluten in my diet. Finding gluten and yeast free bread is nearly impossible.
The Paleo diet is based upon everyday, modern foods that mimic the food groups of our pre-agricultural, hunter-gatherer ancestors. Though there are numerous benefits eating a hunter-gatherer diet, there are seven fundamental characteristics of hunter-gatherer diets that help to optimize your health, minimize your risk of chronic disease, and to lose weight and keep it off.
My substitutions were coconut flour instead of arrowroot and honey for maple syrup AND regular gluten free flour instead of almond flour….some almond flour but not all. I also used 3 large eggs instead of 4 medium ones. With saying all of that I had to put more liquid in..it was too dense. Coconut flour needs more liquid. The bread tastes great but it’s too dense and didn’the rIse enough. Did the maple syrup vs honey or lack of one egg have anything to do with that density? I also don’the like the sweet taste in bread. Don’t eat any sugar so I am probably super sensitive to that taste. Your thoughts on the density, not rising enough and 3 large eggs vs 4 medium ones, in terms of making the bread rise more? Also would like a harder seeded bread. Do u have a recipe for that? I like hard breads. The taste is very good but not for breakfast or sandwiches. Not for me at any rate. Any suggestions? Thanks for ur help!
Cordain explains that high intake of fruits and vegetables is one of best ways to reduce chances of cancer and heart disease. He notes that protein has twice the calorie burning effect of fat and carbs and is more satiating than both. He explains that starch, fats, sugars, and salts together cause us to keep eating. So if we limit our diet to fruits and vegetables and/or meat, we’ll stop eating when we’re full. And if you stop eating when you’re full, you’ll lose weight and won’t get fat. And as you lose weight, your cholesterol will improve (regardless of what you eat). This all makes sense and can’t really be disputed. If you want to lose weight, the Paleo diet will get you there and probably quickly. But Cordain’s hypothesis applied to long-term health falls short.
Where does nutrition info come from? Nutrition facts are provided as a courtesy, sourced from the USDA Food Database. You can find individual ingredient carb counts we use in the Low Carb & Keto Food List. Carb count excludes sugar alcohols. Net carb count excludes both fiber and sugar alcohols, because these do not affect blood sugar in most people. We try to be accurate, but feel free to make your own calculations.
This bread is, hands down, THE best GF/paleo bread I have ever had or made in my life. It is so simple, so easy, so perfect, and so delicious that I haven’t been able to stop staring at it, mouth agape. (Quite convenient since that makes it easier for me to continuously eat it.) With Kerry butter it is simply divine. I will never want for another quick/soda bread recipe ever again.
Hi! I eventually used flaxseed meal, as the recipe suggested so that could not have been it. I eventually made another loaf the next day, using the left over dry mixture I had, adding some more almond flour, and golden flaxseed meal. Essentially I reduced the ratio of the dry ingredients to give the loaf a more spreadable texture. That seemed to work, although I cannot remember exactly the ratio in which the dry ingredients were reduced! memo to self: make notes IMMEDIATELY.
Hi Kim, thank you for your feedback. I think it’s interesting that the recipe turned out well using coconut flour instead. I would love it if you could post a photo of your bread here in the comments so I can see it. Substituting coconut flour for almond flour is tricky, and I think it worked out for you because you cut the amount of flour added in half.
Made this today. Came out perfectly! Hubby and son are grain free, and son has Autism which comes with food sensory issues and limited palate! My son liked this bread. It’s true that it’s not a standard slice like with traditional loaves made with wheat flour, but it’s big enough to make a sandwich still. Thanks for the great recipe! Tried to rate it but it won’t let me go up to 5 stars so rather than give you less, I’ll just not rate it officially. But….5 stars!!
I notice that you call for Celtic sea salt in your recipes – any particular reason why you call for that over other kinds of salt – i.e., regular table salt, kosher salt, or other types of sea salts? I ask because I don’t have this particular salt at home, but have others, and don’t want to ruin the recipe(s) if the measurement conversions are different for fine ground vs. coarse, for instance….
Love, love, love! I make a double batch and freeze them with great results. I toast these rolls for all kinds of sandwiches including toasted with bacon, egg, avocado for breakfast. Recently I started sprinkling Trader Joe’s Everything but the Bagel Sesame Seasoning Blend on the tops before baking. Toasted with butter is a great substitute for bagels or hard rolls. Thank you Lexi for such a great recipe!
I just made this today. It is awesome! I try to stay away from gluten as much as possible due to joint issues and pain. It helps considerably. This bread was easy and I even changed a few things. First, I put in 1/4 cup of hemp hearts in place of 1/4 cup of almond meal. For honey, I was out, I used date palm sugar. Finally, I was a bit short of coconut oil, so I added a bit of olive oil. The bread came out amazing. It fits into my diet, it is quick, easy, and yummy! Thanks so much.

Chris Masterjohn has Cholesterol: Your Life Depends on It!, another web site pointing out that the war on cholesterol and the push to put people on statins is misguided. The site argues it is actually polyunsaturated fats, not saturated fats or cholesterol, that contribute to heart disease, cancer, liver damage, and aging. He also has a popular blog.
While there is wide variability in the way the paleo diet is interpreted,[6] the diet typically includes vegetables, fruits, nuts, roots, and meat and typically excludes foods such as dairy products, grains, sugar, legumes, processed oils, salt, alcohol or coffee.[1][additional citation(s) needed] The diet is based on avoiding not just processed foods, but rather the foods that humans began eating after the Neolithic Revolution when humans transitioned from hunter-gatherer lifestyles to settled agriculture.[3] The ideas behind the diet can be traced to Walter Voegtlin,[7] and were popularized in the best-selling books of Loren Cordain.[8]
Even if eating only foods available to hunter–gatherers in the Paleolithic made sense, it would be impossible. As Christina Warinner of the University of Zurich emphasizes in her 2012 TED talk, just about every single species commonly consumed today—whether a fruit, vegetable or animal—is drastically different from its Paleolithic predecessor. In most cases, we have transformed the species we eat through artificial selection: we have bred cows, chickens and goats to provide as much meat, milk and eggs as possible and have sown seeds only from plants with the most desirable traits—with the biggest fruits, plumpest kernels, sweetest flesh and fewest natural toxins. Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and kale are all different cultivars of a single species, Brassica oleracea; generation by generation, we reshaped this one plant's leaves, stems and flowers into wildly different arrangements, the same way we bred Welsh corgis, pugs, dachshunds, Saint Bernards and greyhounds out of a single wolf species. Corn was once a straggly grass known as teosinte and tomatoes were once much smaller berries. And the wild ancestors of bananas were rife with seeds.
I know that soy can cause inflammation and if you are not using soy free eggs, that could be part of the cause. It may not be the actual egg but the soy that is the problem. just a thought. Here is an article that has some interesting info on soy. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/29/soy-effects-on-women.aspx?e_cid=20120729_SNL_Art_1
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