I don’t like keeping track of how much I’ve eaten or obsessing over how many grams of a particular nutrient I’ve had. Not only do I hate counting calories, but I know that calories are really only half of the battle, as they’re not all created equal – 400 calories of Doritos do NOT have the same effect on your body as 400 calories of high-quality vegetables and protein.
Unlike real fudge, you do not need to carefully labor over a stove with a candy thermometer to create this deliciously sweet treat. Instead, all you have to do is mix together tahini with a few other ingredients before freezing it and then you’re done! The ground sesame seeds create a smooth base for the fudge and they are also a great source of iron and calcium. This fudge is a great way to satisfy your sweet tooth quickly while sticking to the paleo diet.
I decided to make these magic little bars into paleo 7 layer bars to avoid all the refined sugar and grains that you’ll typically find in a 7 layer bar. There was just one last question I needed to have answered: What’s the difference between magic bars and 7 layer bars???  I finally found out: NOTHING!  You could easily just call these bars 7 layer magic bars.
Alcohol is a no-no if you are strict paleo. Beer is made from grains, and liquor also contains traces of gluten. But, good news for cider-lovers: most hard ciders are gluten-free, so they are allowed. Check the label to be sure. Red wine is more accepted in the paleo community because it contains the antioxidant resveratrol, but sorry chardonnay lovers, white wine is technically not allowed.
*Sometimes instead of regular guacamole, I’ll make “guacachoke dip”, which is this: take a large can of artichoke hearts, an avocado, a quarter cup of lime juice, a pinch of cumin, and a pinch of chile powder and mix it up in a blender or food processor. You can add olive oil or coconut milk to make it creamier if you want. This little creation is amazing and can be served with pretty much any meat or veggie. Yum :)
Don't go running away from this (slightly) longer list of ingredients just yet. These two-bite minis look—and taste—like something from the Cheesecake Factory, but they’re packed with good-for-you ingredients, like zucchini and cashews. They're worth every second (and every speckle of coconut sugar). Craving a caveman-size slab instead of these dainty bites? Just add the crust to a pie pan and make one big cheesecake instead.

Almonds are paleo-approved, but it can sometimes be hard to just stop at a handful. While almonds are packed with protein, healthy fats, and an amino acid L-arginine that can help you burn more fat during workouts, they are also calorie dense—if you’re not careful, you can end up downing hundreds of calories worth of almonds in one sitting. That’s why we love these 100 calorie packs. They’re perfectly portioned and contain only whole natural almonds without sketchy ingredients or additives.


Many of you have tried some version of a stuffed vegetable at your meals such as a tuna-stuffed tomato or beef-stuffed peppers, but there is no reason why you can’t incorporate similar items into your snacks as part of your Paleo plan.  By rotating various colorful varieties of vegetables into your snacks, you’ll  be fueling your body with loads of vitamins, minerals, and anti-oxidants.  Stuffed vegetables can be made into gluten-free, grain-free, dairy-free snack options with a little creativity and advance preparation.  Definitely not taste-free, glance over some of the recipes listed below and see which one sounds like it might be a tasty addition to your snack rotation:
Hi Janice, thank you for your comment! Certainly, many people who try the Paleo diet are able to do so while making sure that they are aqequately fueling their bodies, but I think that you’re right in saying that any type of diet can be a societally accepted way to restrict certain types of food deemed “bad” or “unhealthy” Thank you again for sharing your thoughts. Take care, Natalie
This single serving snack manages to taste like a decadent dessert while still being entirely healthy. This cookies and cream dip is good on slices of fresh fruit, but it is so tasty that some people just eat it with a spoon! It can quickly be whipped together from applesauce, protein powder, and a few other paleo foods that most people have in their cabinets, so it is the ideal snack for when midnight sugar cravings suddenly strike.
Unless a package of beef jerky says it’s Paleo, it’s best to make it on your own, and this recipe will walk you through the process. She’s come up with the perfect blend of spices and the right method for how to get the meat just right. You won’t want to go back to store bought jerky once you make a batch of this. You get to do quality control, choosing lean cuts of sirloin to make it. Then add the spices and seasoning like garlic powder and onion powder. Red wine even makes an appearance, and you’ll be happily surprised at the finished product.
Thanks for asking (kinda). Back in the day, about two years ago, I baked nonstop. I baked even more than I do now that I have a food blog (which is A LOT). Every day, I would make 4-6 batches of cookies. Then, I’d make nice cream (which was called banana soft serve back then), meal prep for the next two weeks, then spend the night putting together packages for my sisters.
The Primal Blueprint Cookbook: Primal, Low Carb, Paleo, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free and Gluten-Free by Mark Sisson and Jennifer Meier. Recipes include: Roasted Leg of Lamb with Herbs and Garlic, Salmon Chowder with Coconut Milk, Tomatoes Stuffed with Ground Bison and Eggs, and Baked Chocolate Custard. Recipes are simple and have limited ingredients. Complaints are the book is stuffed with unnecessary photos and proofreading could have been better, e.g. oven temperatures were left out. And recipes are not truly paleo. Despite what is on the cover dairy is used in some recipes. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars.
Saturated fat has been demonized by our health authorities and media. What is the basis for this position on Saturated fat? Are current recommendations for VERY low saturated fat intake justified? How much saturated fat (and what types), if any should one eat? Without a historical and scientific perspective these questions can be nearly impossible to answer.
And again, there’s no concrete scientific proof that the paleo diet wards off disease, Sandon says. Any evidence of its benefits is anecdotal. Although some studies seem to support the benefits of the paleo diet, many scientists still believe we don’t yet have enough evidence to know whether the eating approach is totally healthy and without risk. “Nobody knows the long-term effects of this diet because no one has researched it to any degree,” Sandon says. It’s not really a new concept; instead it’s one that’s been recycled through the years, she adds.
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